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Stamp out dog poo problem on Pringle Park

Dog mess in Pringle Park in Selkirk.

Dog mess in Pringle Park in Selkirk.

Dog walkers who don’t bag up their pooches’ poo on Pringle Park will be ‘named and shamed’, the new playpark’s campaigners have warned.

“Dog fouling is unpleasant, unpopular and a health hazard,” summed up Margaret Sweetnam, chair of Selkirk’s Playpark Project Scheme, which secured £335,000 to build the new children’s facility.

“There is a great deal of concern in the community about this issue,” she added. “It does seem particularly bad around the Pringle Park.”

Work began building the playground in October, but the expected four month construction was delayed by the winter’s wet weather, pushing back the opening to May at the earliest. The community group said if dog-fouling continues, it may need to extra cash to protect the park and playing children, and, if necessary, expose the poop pests.

“We are exploring the possibility of fencing or hedging the toddler play area,” Mrs Sweetnam told us, “as children of this age are most at risk of coming into unwanted contact with dog mess”.

“We are all in favour of ‘naming and shaming’, and we urge the public to report people who are allowing their dogs to foul the area.

“You can report a dog fouling problem online, anonymously, or call 0300 1001800.

“Most dog owners are responsible and clean up after their dogs, but some don’t.

“It is the law that you must clean up after your dog. This means bagging the dog dirt and disposing of it.

“You can take it home and put it in your own bin or you can use public litter bins. Do not leave bagged dog dirt anywhere else.

“Wardens will be keeping a close eye on the Pringle Park in the coming weeks. Anyone who does not immediately clean-up fouling by a dog is committing an offence under the Dog Fouling (Scotland) Act 2003.

“People who do not clean-up after their dog can receive a fixed penalty of £40, rising to £60 if not paid within 28 days.

“We know it’s tempting when you go out with your dog early in the morning or late at night, especially in the dark, to just walk away from the poo.

“But it’s not going to be as easy as that when the new play area opens – there will be more daylight, new bins and we’re going to be watching and waiting for offenders – with a spare poo bag in our pockets. Let’s all do our bit to stamp out this really offensive problem.”

 

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